The Studio 10: Hugging Trees

by Tim Alatorre

0010-Hugging_Trees

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We don’t have a guest! Run for the hills!!  Just news today.  There is lots going on in the Cal Poly community and Haley shares some interesting articles on green architecture.  Tim is getting ready for his CSE!!!!! Good times and full speed ahead!

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  • We missed questions from the chat room last week, we’re sorry!
  • Get Beth (Wilson) McIntire to redo your resume!  It worked for Tim!
    • Email: ejw24 at hotmail.com
Cal Poly Schedule:
  • March 12 Last day of classes
  • March 15-19 Final Exam Week
  • March 23-28 Academic Holiday

News:

  • Cal Poly Architecture Reception, Irvine, CA
    • Date: Wednesday, March 10th, 2010 5:30 – 8:30 p.m.
    • Location: LPA Irvine: 5161 California Avenue, Suite 100, Irvine, CA 92617. Phone (946) 261-1001
    • RSVP: Architecture Department, architecture@calpoly.edu, or (805) 756-1316.
  • LPA Irvine web page: http://www.lpainc.com/
    • Dr. Alfred Jacoby, Director of the Dessau Bauhaus, will be speaking at 6:00 p.m. on the history of the Bauhaus.
    • Cal Poly Architecture Department’s annual AIA Alumni Reception!
    • Date: Thursday, June 10, 2010
    • Location: Miami, Florida (details TBA)
    • RSVP online at: http://www.arch.calpoly.edu/alumni/index.html
  • Department Head’s image gallery
  • Scaling up Solar Power
    • http://www.technologyreview.com/energy/24582/
    • Applied materials makes the equipment needed to produce the biggest solar panels in the world.
    • Explaining how solar units the size of garage doors are made. These large panels could help improve the economics of solar production and are more efficient than smaller panels with one of the highest yields in the industry (about 500 watts each). They also require fewer junction boxes and less cabling.
    • Goal of Applied Materials is to try and lower the cost of production to $1 per watt by the year’s end.
  • Earthquake Rebuilding with Recycled Tires
    • http://www.treehugger.com/files/2010/02/earthquake-rebuilding-with-recycled-tire-logs.php
    • Using ‘logs’ made of recycled tires have been successful in civil engineering projects such as sea walls, highway barriers, and erosion control.
    • Material show potential for use in structures needed to resist blasts and other types of impacts, or applications requiring environmental and physical stresses without deterioration.
    • Interesting breakdown of what happens to recycled tires.
    • 300 million tires are disposed of in 2006!!
  • Why Chile is Better Than Haiti at Handling Earthquakes
    • http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,1968576,00.html
    • Comparisons between the two countries recent earthquakes, the impacts, damage and casualties are vastly different.
    • MAJOR POINT: The government in Chile forces builders to adhere to rigorous codes. In recent decades Chile has mandated earthquake-proofing for new structures. Materials such as rubber and counterweight features have been incorporated into designs allowing buildings to bend and sway rather than break.
    • As efforts move forward to rebuild Haiti there are reasons to demand adherence to a set of building regulation free from past government corruption and bribery.
    • While the two countries are worlds apart (in GDP and government policy), there are things that can be learned as we move forward with aid to both.
  • The Pei Master
  • How’s the Environment doing? Ask the Buildings
    • http://edition.cnn.com/2010/TECH/02/25/eco.design.tech/index.html
    • Getting a ‘status update’ from intelligent building or structure isn’t so far fetched according to some designers.
    • Interesting ideas of including public involvement in understanding energy useage and offering incentives rewarding good behavior and collective responsibility.
    • Some question the “smarts of smart design”. Think about a park bench that dumps off people that have outstayed their welcome or a trash can the throws unapproved garbage back at you.
    • We talk about ways to make buildings more responsive to user activities in an effort to educate and change behavior.
  • Thanks to all our Facebook fans!
    • Check out http://www.acercas.es/ It’s a great Spanish Revit blog with a community of almost 6,000 persons!
    • They also mentioned us last December which makes them extra cool!

We want your input and contributions!  We are seeking article submissions and segments for the show.  Record your segment and send it to us!


About the Author


Tim Alatorre